World TVET Database - Country Profiles

As of April 2017, a number of updated Country TVET Profiles will be available in a new and more user friendly format with some new features (for example, statistical information).

Malta

TVET Country Profile
1. TVET mission
2. System
3. Governance and financing
4. TVET teachers and trainers
5. Qualifications
6. Projects
7. Statistical information
8. Links
9. References
Malta
published: 2015-08-19

1. TVET mission, legislation and national policy or strategy

TVET mission

According to the National Vocational Education and Training policy, Vocational Education and Training (VET) in Malta has social and economic functions. For example, the promotion of VET is a method to respond to broader societal challenges, including promoting social cohesion. VET also fosters employability by providing an opportunity to further education and skills. In this light, the promotion of VET in Malta is an approach towards mitigating labour market exigencies by shaping skills development in accordance to the needs of specific sectors.

TVET strategy

The National Vocational Education and Training Policy (2015) came about following consultations between stakeholders and was developed in the context of the Bruges Communique’s appraisal of Malta’s performance in the field of VET. Referring to the Bruges Communique’s assessment, the policy document comments on eleven strategic objectives which Malta has improved on in the field of VET, including:

  • Making Initial Vocational Education and Training (IVET) an attractive learning option by providing a variety of VET courses and including VET subjects in secondary compulsory education;
  • Fostering the quality and relevance of IVET and Continuing Vocational Education and Training (CVET) by establishing a Quality Assurance framework;
  • Enabling flexible access to training and qualifications;
  • Developing a strategic approach to incorporating IVET and CVET within the education system and promoting international mobility;
  • Fostering innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship, as well as the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in IVET and CVET;
  • Promoting inclusive IVET and CVET and helping people manage their careers and play an active role in society;
  • Supporting the involvement of VET stakeholders in the provision and governance of VET and enabling greater visibility for the achievements of European cooperation in VET;
  • Coordinating governance of European and national instruments in the areas of transparency, recognition, quality assurance and mobility;
  • Intensifying cooperation between VET policy and other relevant policy areas;
  • Improving the quality and comparability of data for EU policy making in VET; and
  • Ensuring the efficient use of European Union (EU) support.
The National Vocational Education and Training Policy also identifies a number of strategic areas which relevant stakeholders should address in order to improve the provision of VET in Malta. Specifically the policy documents emphasise the need to:

  • Set up a National VET Steering Group that brings together all stakeholders involved in the provision and governance of VET in Malta;
  • Ensure that VET programmes are linked to the needs of the labour market;
  • Maximise the collection and use of data to facilitate the governance of VET;
  • Increase the number of under-graduate and post-graduate programmes and research in VET Subjects;
  • Implement VET as a parallel stream to General Education;
  • Support the growth of private VET provision;
  • Explore VET Funding Alternatives;
  • Establish links between the VET sector and other national and international actors;
  • Promote VET relationships with foreign colleges and institutions;
  • Improve Quality Assurance in VET;
  • Advance the Credit system for VET;
  • Promote Work Based Learning;
  • Support the Validation of Informal and Non-Formal Learning (VINFIL) and strengthen its relationship with the VET system;
  • Promote VET through Lifelong Learning Opportunities in order to reach the EU Target of 15% of adults participating in education and training by 2020;
  • Provide more comprehensive career education and guidance;
  • Promote inclusiveness in the VET sector;
  • Improve teacher training and development; and
  • Modernise pedagogies, andragogies and the curricula.
TVET legislation

  • Chapter 327 (Education Act) regulates the education system in Malta. The Education Act stipulates that State VET institutions, namely the Malta College of Arts, Science and Technology (MCAST) and the Institute of Tourism Studies (ITS), provide training for free. The Education Act also specifies the scope and organisation structure of the aforementioned VET providers. It provides these two entities the legal power to issue qualifications.
The Education Act also contains specific subsidiary legislations that regulate specific aspects such as:

  • SL 327.431 – Malta Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning Regulations;
  • SL 327.432 – Validation of Non-Formal and Informal Learning Regulations; and
  • SL 327.433 – Further and Higher Education (Licensing Accreditation and Quality Assurance) Regulations.
  • Legal Notice 295 (2012) regulates the validation of informal and non-formal learning. It also regulates the granting of validation awards classified within the Malta Qualifications Framework (MQF). The National Commission for Further and Higher Education (NCFHE) has the power to establish a Sector Skills Committee to govern and regulate the validation process. Sector Skills Units are also to be set up with their main initial focus to be that of establishing occupational standards and the respective validation process in the given sector.
Sources:

  • Ministry for Education and Employment (2015). National Vocational Education and Training Policy. Valletta: Ministry for Education and Employment. Accessed: 16 June 2015.
  • National Commission for Further and Higher Education (2015). Legislation. Accessed: 16 June 2015.


    Back to top

    2. TVET formal, non-formal and informal systems

Scheme compiled by UNESCO-UNEVOC from Ministry for Education and Employment (2015). National Vocational Education and Training Policy. Valletta: Ministry for Education and Employment.

Upon completion of four years of early education and four years of primary education, students proceed to a secondary education which completes 13 years of compulsory education. Specifically the secondary education system is divided into two parts:

  • Two years of general secondary education; and
  • Three years of secondary education with specialisations.
Upon completion of compulsory education, students can enter the labour market or pursue further education in the form of post-secondary and tertiary education.

Formal TVET system

Vocational Education and Training (VET) subjects are provided at the secondary education level. The National three-year Vocational Pilot Project, launched in 2011, offered vocational qualifications in four vocational subjects in a number of state and non-state schools. In order to mitigate the problem of school drop outs, Malta is currently offering vocational subjects as optional subjects in standard secondary schools as well as vocational colleges.

At the post-compulsory education level, the main state institutions providing initial vocational education and training (IVET) include the Malta College of Arts, Science and Technology (MCAST) and the Institute of Tourism Studies (ITS). MCAST provides vocational courses from the secondary until the under-graduate level, while the ITS provides training up to the post-secondary education level which enables students to take under-graduate level courses at the University of Malta.

Non-formal and informal TVET systems

The MCAST and the ITS provide continuous vocational education and training (CVET) while the Employment and Training Corporation (ETC) is responsible for offering training to the unemployed.

Sources:

  • CEDEFOP ReferNet (2013). Malta VET in Europe – Country Report. Thessaloniki: Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.
  • Ministry for Education and Employment (2015). National Vocational Education and Training Policy. Valletta: Ministry for Education and Employment. Accessed: 16 June 2015.


    Back to top

    3. Governance and financing

Governance

Vocational Education and Training (VET) is provided through a number of public and private institutions. The main institutions involved in the provision of VET in Malta include:

  • Malta College of Arts, Science and Technology (MCAST): The College is composed of a number of institutes focusing on various vocational sectors including: (1) Institute of Agribusiness; (2) Institute of Applied Sciences; (3) Institute of Art and Design; (4) Institute of Building and Construction Engineering; (5) Institute of Business and Commerce; (6) Institute of Community Services; (7) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering; (8) Institute of Information and Communication Technology; (9) Maritime Institute; and the (10) Institute of Mechanical Engineering.
MCAST offers 170 full-time Initial Vocational Education and Training (IVET) courses and over 300 part-time Continuous Vocational Education and Training (CVET) vocational courses. MCAST courses are designed on an outcome based approach to include both key competences and vocational units.

  • Institute of Tourism Studies (ITS): The Institute offers a variety of courses, from foundation/certificate level to Diploma courses and Higher National Diploma Level courses. Subject areas include Hospitality and Tourism Management, Hotel Operations and Events Management, Culinary Arts, Food and Beverage Service, Tourism Information Systems, Tour Guiding and Sports Tourism. The Institute also provides under-graduate level courses.
  • Employment and Training Corporation (ETC): The ETC is Malta’s public employment agency and a licensed Further and Higher Education Institute. The ETC offers a variety of training programmes to employed as well as unemployed individuals. Programmes range from short courses to traineeships and focus on basic competences in literacy and soft skills, to more trade and technical courses. ETC currently offers six courses at the Malta Qualifications Framework (MQF) Level 1, 22 courses at MQF Level 2, 16 courses at MQF Level 3 and six courses at MQF Level 4.
  • Directorate for Lifelong Learning and Early School Leavers (DLLL): The Adult learning unit of the DLLL offers courses in a number of areas, including: (1) languages; (2) mathematical, science and technological subjects; (3) Information and Communications Technology (ICT); (4) Entrepreneurship; (5) Social issues (including health) and civic competence; and (6) other vocational subjects. In total, the Adult learning Unit offers 277 subjects available for lifelong learners in Malta and Gozo. VET courses are accredited at VET level 1 while those at level 2 are in the process of being accredited.
  • Agenzija Zghazagh: Agenzija Zghazagh is Malta’s Youth Agency and offers the Youth.Inc programme, an inclusive education programme based on applied learning aimed at young people between the age of 16 and 21. The programme aims to help young people improve their standard of education and gain more knowledge, values and skills to enter the labour market or gain qualifications to continue in further education and/or training. Youth.inc is currently being offered as a full-time Level 1 and Level 2 programme.
Financing

Vocational Education and Training in Malta is mainly financed by the Government of Malta. VET courses are also able to generate extra revenue through the provision of part time courses at a fee. All full time day courses at MCAST and ITS are free to Maltese and European Union (EU) nationals. Maltese students attending full time courses at MCAST and ITS also receive a monthly stipend and another annual cash allowance which can be used to purchase educational material and resources.

VET institutions also have the opportunity to apply for EU funding. MCAST for example has benefitted from various funding programmes provided by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and ESF Erasmus. MCAST also actively collaborates with local industry and has signed various Memoranda of Understanding that have resulted in industry donating or financing equipment for MCAST.

Sources:

  • Ministry for Education and Employment (2015). National Vocational Education and Training Policy. Valletta: Ministry for Education and Employment. Accessed: 16 June 2015.


    Back to top

    4. TVET teachers and trainers

The National Commission for Further and Higher Education (NCFHE) regulates the minimum formal qualifications required to be a Vocational Education and Training (VET) teacher or trainer. These minimum requirements include:

Education level Qualification requirement to teach
Secondary education (MQF 1-4) Qualification at the post-secondary education level (MQF 5)
Post-secondary education (MQF 5-6) Qualification at under-graduate (MQF 6) or post-graduate (MQF 7) level
Under-graduate education (MQF 7) Relevant qualifications at the post-graduate education level (MQF 8). Teachers with an under-graduate degree (MQF 7) and at least 10 years of relevant experience may be able to provide input
Post-graduate education (MQF 8) Requires teachers with an post-graduate degree (MQF 8)
When there are insufficient numbers of qualified tutors, the NCFHE considers proposals for twinned provision. Under this provision, highly-experienced tutors with lower qualifications are mentored by colleagues with adequate qualifications. Mentors will be present during classes to ensure that the quality and assessment of the courses are maintained. Under such an agreement, the role of the mentoring tutor and collection and use of relevant documentation for Internal Quality Assurance (IQA) purposes has to be clearly defined.

VET providers normally provide further training for teachers and trainers. For example, MCAST offers a post-graduate certificate in VET teaching for those teachers that do not have any particular pedagogical training. However a number of teachers also pursue independent study at the local university, foreign colleges and universities to upgrade their skills or obtain higher qualifications.

Sources:

  • National Commission for Further and Higher Education (2014). Communication to Licensed Further and Higher Education Institutions. Accessed: 16 June 2015.


    Back to top

    5. Qualifications and qualifications frameworks

Secondary vocational education

Programme Duration Qualification
Lower Secondary Education 2 years Diploma
Upper Secondary Education 3 years Diploma or Advanced Diploma
Post-secondary vocational education

Programme Duration Qualification
Post-secondary vocational education 2 years Higher Diploma
Under-graduate 3 years Degree
National Qualifications Framework (NQF)

The Malta Qualifications Framework (MQF) is referenced to the European Qualifications Framework (EQF) and consists of eight levels. Each level has indicators expressed in terms of knowledge, skills (applied knowledge and understanding, judgmental skills and critical abilities, communication skills and learning skills) and Competences. The MQF is as follows:

Scheme extracted from National Commission for Further and Higher Education (2015). Malta Qualifications Framework. http://www.ncfhe.org.mt/content/home-malta-qualifications-framework/5963805/.

In order to obtain a qualification, students are required to complete a number of minimum credits for each level as specified by the referencing report issued by the National Commission for Further and Higher Education (NCFHE).

The Employment and Training Corporation (ETC) and Directorate for Lifelong Learning and Early School Leavers (DLLL) also offer short courses that have a minimum of 4 European Credit System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET) and these are referred to as awards.

Quality assurance

All courses are accredited by the NCFHE except those provided by the Malta College of Arts, Science and Technology (MCAST), ITD and TJE University of Malta which according to Legal Notice 295/2012 have self-accrediting status.

In order to improve quality assurance mechanisms, the NCFHE is implementing the Making Quality Visible project, a European Social Fund (ESF) funded project aimed at developing quality assurance procedures for vocational education providers. One of the main outcomes of the project, the National Quality Assurance Framework for Further and Higher Education Institutions has been instituted under the NSFHE, and provides external and internal Quality Assurance Standards for further and higher education institutions.

Sources:

  • National Commission for Further and Higher Education (2015). Malta Qualifications Framework. Accessed: 16 June 2015.
  • National Commission for Further and Higher Education (2015). National Quality Assurance Framework. Accessed: 16 June 2015.
  • National Commission for Further and Higher Education (2015). Referencing Report. Accessed: 16 June 2015.


    Back to top

    6. Current and ongoing reforms, projects, and challenges

Current reforms and major projects

Current reforms and projects are guided by the National Vocational Education and Training Policy (2015) which provides eighteen strategic areas for improvement (see section 1). One of the current major reforms is the consolidation and further enhancement of work based learning programmes. For example, the administration and coordination of apprenticeship programmes has been transferred from the Employment and Training Cooperation (ETC) to the Malta College of Arts, Science, and Technology (MCAST).

Sources:

  • Ministry for Education and Employment (2015). National Vocational Education and Training Policy. Valletta: Ministry for Education and Employment. Accessed: 16 June 2015.


    Back to top

    7. Statistical information(*)

Population (Million)


2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

0.41
0.41
0.42
0.42
0.42
0.42
Average yearly population growth rate 2010 - 2015

+0.34 %


For comparison:
Global average yearly population growth rate 2005-2010: 1.17%
0.21 0.21
female male  
0.21 0.21
female male  
0.21 0.21
female male  
0.21 0.21
female male  
0.21 0.21
female male  
0.21 0.21
female male  

50.24 %

50.24 %

50.24 %

50.24 %

50.24 %

50.24 %






Back to top

8. Links to UNEVOC centres and TVET institutions

UNEVOC Centres

TVET Institutions


Back to top

9. References, bibliography, abbreviations

References

Abbreviations

  • CVET - Continuing Vocational Education and Training
  • DLLL - Directorate for Lifelong Learning and Early School Leavers
  • ECVET - European Credit System for Vocational Education and Training
  • EQF - European Qualifications Framework
  • ERDF - European Regional Development Fund
  • ESF - European Social Fund
  • ETC - Employment and Training Corporation
  • EU - European Union
  • ICT - Information and Communications Technology
  • IQA - Internal Quality Assurance
  • ITS - Institute of Tourism Studies
  • IVET - Initial Vocational Education and Training
  • MCAST - Malta College of Arts, Science and Technology
  • MQF - Malta Qualifications Framework
  • NCFHE - National Commission for Further and Higher Education
  • NQF - National Qualifications Framework
  • VET - Vocational Education and Training
  • VINFIL - Validation of Informal and Non-Formal Learning




Published by: UNESCO-UNEVOC
Publication Date: 2015-08-19
Validated by: Malta College of Arts, Science and Technology (MCAST)



page date 2017-02-22

Back to top