World TVET Database - Country Profiles

Qatar

TVET Country Profile
1. TVET mission
2. System
3. Governance and financing
4. TVET teachers and trainers
5. Qualifications
6. Projects
7. Statistical information
8. Links
9. References
Qatar
published: 2014-12-11

1. TVET mission, legislation and national policy or strategy

TVET mission

The Qatar National Vision (QNV) 2030 aims at a progressive transformation in Qatar, and education and training are key to this development aspiration. The National Development Strategy 2011-2016 (NDS) is a multi-project initiative aiming to create an educated, capable and motivated workforce. The NDS states that the aim of the TVET mission is to prepare students directly for professional activities.

TVET strategy

The NDS outlines the TVET national policies in a programme called “Strengthening technical education and vocational training”. This programme has been designed to achieve three outcomes:

  • A regulatory framework and plan for the development of high-quality, appropriate and well-managed TVET offerings, including an organisational model that is able to support the development of the capabilities of the TVET system;
  • TVET programmes and outputs aligned to the needs of the Qatari society and the labour market; and
  • Improved perception of TVET programmes in order to increase enrolment rates and better prepare the entire Qatari population for the labour force.
TVET legislation

  • The Compulsory Education Law No. 25 adopted in 2001 and amended in 2009 stipulates that education is free of charge and compulsory until the end of secondary education, which includes TVET programmes
  • The Emiri Decree No. 14 of 2009 establishes the Supreme Education Council (SEC), replacing the Ministry of Education. The Decree calls on the SEC to assign regulation in the area of education, license private and public funded schools, set professional standards and license teachers. The Emiri Decree also states that all government schools are now independent government funded schools.
Sources:

  • Qatar General Secretariat for Development Planning (2011). Qatar National Development Strategy 2011-2016. Towards Qatar National Vision 2030. Doha: Qatar General Secretariat for Development Planning.
  • Supreme Education Council (2011). Education and Training Sector Strategy 2011-2016. Doha: Supreme Education Council.
  • UNESCO-IBE (2011). World Data on Education VII Ed. 2010/11. Qatar. Geneva: UNESCO-IBE.


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    2. TVET formal, non-formal and informal systems

Scheme compiled by UNESCO-UNEVOC from Qatar General Secretariat for Development Planning (2011). Qatar National Development Strategy 2011-2016. Towards Qatar National Vision 2030. Doha: Qatar General Secretariat for Development Planning.

The education system consists of 1-2 years of pre-school, 6 years of primary school, and 3 years of preparatory school, known in Qatar as K-12 general education. Upon completion of K-12, students may proceed to a general, commercial or technical secondary school.

Formal TVET system

Currently there are limited TVET options available at the secondary education level – and these are available for boys only. TVET programmes are offered at one independent technical secondary school, and one independent banking studies and business administration secondary school.

Non-formal and informal TVET systems

There is currently an emphasis on formalising the qualifications system and the recognition of training, while developing further programmes and facilities which meet the needs of the labour market through consultation and co-operation, including joint ventures, with the employers.

Sources:

  • Qatar General Secretariat for Development Planning (2011). Qatar National Development Strategy 2011-2016. Towards Qatar National Vision 2030. Doha: Qatar General Secretariat for Development Planning.


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3. Governance and financing

Governance

The Supreme Education Council (SEC) directs the nation's education policy and plays an integral role in the development and implementation of the education reform effort. The SEC also approves the contracts for the independent schools. In April 2009 a decree reaffirmed the authority of the SEC and consolidated the Ministry of Education personnel and schools into the SEC. Three Institutes are operating under the SEC: the Education Institute, the Evaluation Institute, and the High Education Institute.

The Education Institute oversees and supports independent and semi-independent schools. The Institute is responsible for establishing rigorous curriculum standards and ensuring schools are equipped to meet those standards. The Institute issues licenses for and monitors the private schools.

The Evaluation Institute develops and conducts comprehensive national assessments of student learning and oversees licensing of teachers and data collection. The Institute leads Qatar's participation in the most important international education assessments. In 2008 the Qatar Office for Registration, Licensing and Accreditation has been established at the Evaluation Institute to issue provisional and full licenses to teachers and school leaders according to the National Professional Standards for Teachers and School Leaders (NPSTL).

The Higher Education Institute guides students through the college application process and handles certificate equivalency.

Independent schools are established by the education reform initiative “Education for a New Era”, which transformed all government schools into autonomous independent schools to carry out its educational mission and objectives while being held accountable. All independent schools must meet established curriculum standards and comply with periodic financial audits. The organisational structure of the school includes the Board of Trustees which is an element of legal organisation required for every independent school. Its role is to direct and give advice, represent parents and the community, and help the school in quality control.

Financing

In Qatar, education is free at all levels for Qatari nationals. Article 49 of the Constitution stipulates that education is the right of every citizen; the State shall extend efforts to achieve free and compulsory general education according to the applicable laws and rules in Qatar. Law No. 25 adopted in 2001 and amended in 2009 stipulates that education is free of charge.

Independent government vocational secondary schools are funded by the Supreme Education Council (SEC) in conjunction with Qatar Petroleum (technical schools) and the Central Bank (banking and business administration). TVET institutions at the post-secondary education level, including the Community College of Qatar (CCQ) and the College of the North Atlantic – Qatar (CNA-Q) are also government funded. Having said this, students at the post-secondary education level are also often sponsored by employers.

TVET programmes under other ministries such as the Ministry of the Interior (police institute), the Ministry of Defence and the Ministry of Administrative Development are financed by the respective ministries.

Students attending private TVET institutions are often sponsored by employers. Private TVET institutions are licensed by the Higher Education Institute and the SEC.

Sources:

  • Supreme Education Council (2011). Education and Training Sector Strategy 2011-2016. Doha: Supreme Education Council.


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4. TVET teachers and trainers

Qatar positions teachers at the core of its education reform, enabling the new independent schools to hire freely staff who possess a deep understanding of subject matter and to employ proven techniques in contemporary teaching. The National Professional Standards for Teachers and School Leaders (NPSTL) are designed to describe the abilities and knowledge necessary for teachers and leaders, application and understanding of that knowledge as well as the quality teaching and leadership practice in the independent schools.

With reference to (NPSTL), professional licenses for teachers are established. For instance, the Supreme Education Council (SEC) established the Vocational License Office for Teachers and School Leaders in the Assessment Agency in 2008, the office is responsible for awarding vocational licenses for leaders and teachers in independent schools.

In general, within the framework of the education reform initiated in 2002, the qualifications for Qatari teachers who teach in independent secondary schools are:

  • a bachelor's degree in education with a specialty in mathematics, science, English or Arabic; or
  • a bachelor's degree (not in education) in science or mathematics or Arabic or English plus three years of experience as a teacher in a school; or
  • a bachelor's degree and a diploma in secondary education.
The Education Institute under the SEC offers a variety of teacher training programmes in order to support independent school teachers in their professional development and growth. Topics being addressed include: best practices for teaching; the new curriculum standards; preparing students for annual assessments; and the special needs of new teachers. There are also training programmes designed to enhance the skills and knowledge of experienced teachers, who may then be invited to develop coursework, lead training, mentor new teachers, and become master teachers.

The Qatar Office for Registration, Licensing and Accreditation (QORLA) was established in 2008 under the Evaluation Institute to support and improve the quality of teacher and school leader practice and to ensure the alignment to NPSTL.

Sources:

  • Webpage of the Supreme Education Council. Accessed: 01 November 2013.
  • UNESCO-IBE (2011). World Data on Education VII Ed. 2010/11. Qatar. Geneva: UNESCO-IBE.


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    5. Qualifications and qualifications frameworks

A final examination is held at the end of secondary education and the secondary technical or commercial certificate is awarded depending on the chosen stream to those who pass the exam successfully.

National Qualifications Framework (NQF)

The government aims to develop a NQF through the following steps:

  • appoint an oversight body and determine the organisations and process model needed to conduct assigned functions;
  • determine the scope of the NQF;
  • decide on the reference model and structure for the NQF;
  • build on the existing Supreme Education Council vocational education training initiative in deciding on international standards to be adopted by Qatar; and
  • customise occupational standards.
Some progress has been achieved such as:

  • Standards for a NQF have been defined;
  • A system of occupational standards for relevant professions has been developed and is currently being implemented; and
  • A National Qualifications Authority has been established.
Quality assurance

Under the programme “Strengthening Technical education and Vocational Training”, the government aims at (1) establishing a TVET supervisory body and (2) adopting a new model for accreditation and licensing.

With regard to establishing a TVET supervisory body, the government has set the following action plan:

  • define key functions, such as planning, quality assurance, oversight of a NQF and occupational standards, benchmark against similar functions performed in comparable international institutions and determine a model appropriate for Qatar;
  • assess institutional capacity to support identified key functions; and
  • review laws and policies that establish supervisory authority that extends government licensing of private sector TVET.
With regard to adopting a new model for accreditation and licensing, the government has set the following action plan:

  • benchmark international best practices; and
  • develop licensing criteria for current and new institutions.
Sources:

  • Qatar General Secretariat for Development Planning (2011). Qatar National Development Strategy 2011-2016. Towards Qatar National Vision 2030. Doha: Qatar General Secretariat for Development Planning.
  • Supreme Education Council (2011). Education and Training Sector Strategy 2011-2016. Doha: Supreme Education Council.
  • UNESCO-IBE (2011). World Data on Education VII Ed. 2010/11. Qatar. Geneva: UNESCO-IBE.


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    6. Current and ongoing reforms, projects, and challenges

Current reforms and major projects

Further projects associated with the NDS 2011-2016 and the “Strengthening technical education and vocational training” programmes are:

  • assessing the reputation of TVET institutions and promoting them as a centre piece for professional careers with the aim to increase Qatari enrolment;
  • developing differentiated TVET programmes catering to labour market needs; and
  • establishing a model for developing partnerships between the public and private sector to develop further TVET offerings and to set up partnerships according to this model.
Challenges

Compared with other components of the education system, Qatar has not invested as much time and resources in TVET. Qatar therefore aims to pay more attention to TVET through addressing the basic infrastructure and inputs for TVET offerings including building additional capacity to fill institutional gaps as in girls’ secondary technical and vocational schools.

Sources:

  • Supreme Education Council (2011). Education and Training Sector Strategy 2011-2016. Doha: Supreme Education Council.


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    7. Statistical information(*)

Population (Million)


2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

0.82
0.97
1.15
1.36
1.56
1.75
Average yearly population growth rate 2005 - 2010

+22.63 %


For comparison:
Global average yearly population growth rate 2005-2010: 1.17%
0.27 0.55
female male  
0.30 0.67
female male  
0.33 0.82
female male  
0.36 1.00
female male  
0.40 1.17
female male  
0.42 1.33
female male  

33.37 %

30.89 %

28.47 %

26.49 %

25.27 %

24.24 %



Table compiled by UNESCO-UNEVOC based on UN ESA: World Population Prospects/ the 2012 revision

GDP per capita (currency: US$)


2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010


54 229

69 921

69 167

84 813

62 528

71 510


Table compiled by UNESCO-UNEVOC based on World Bank Database

Participation in TVET (% of upper secondary)


2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2%

2%

2%

2%

2%

2%

2%

1%

Average yearly population growth rate 2005 - 2012

-7.14 %

0 4
female male  
0 4
female male  
0 5
female male  
0 4
female male  
0 4
female male  
0 4
female male  
0 4
female male  
0 3
female male  
(ratio 0 %) (ratio 0 %) (ratio 0 %) (ratio 0 %) (ratio 0 %) (ratio 0 %) (ratio 0 %) (ratio 0 %)


Table compiled by UNESCO-UNEVOC based on UNESCO Institute for Statistics, Data Centre-beta Country Profiles


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8. Links to UNEVOC centres and TVET institutions

UNEVOC Centres

TVET Institutions

  • College of the North Atlantic-Qatar (CNAQ)
  • Community College of Qatar (CCQ)
  • Qatar Chamber of Commerce
  • Qatar Independent Technical School
  • Supreme Education Council (SEC)


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    9. References, bibliography, abbreviations

References

Abbreviations

  • CNA-Q - College of the North Atlantic-Qatar
  • CCQ - Community College of Qatar
  • NDS - National Development Strategy
  • NPSTL - National Professional Standards for Teachers and School Leaders
  • NQF - National Qualifications Framework
  • QNV - Qatar National Vision
  • QORLA - Qatar Office for Registration, Licensing and Accreditation
  • SEC - Supreme Education Council
  • TVET - Technical and Vocational Education and Training




Published by: UNESCO-UNEVOC
Publication Date: 2014-12-11
Validated by: Supreme Education Council, Qatar



page date 2017-05-05

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